FIVE (5) WAYS VILLAGERS CATCH FISH IN TAMAN NEGARA PAHANG

The Pahang River is renowned as the longest river on the Malay Peninsula and is rich in diverse species of wild freshwater fish. It serves as a source of food and a modest income for the inhabitants along the Pahang River, particularly the villagers in Taman Negara Pahang.

Most of the villagers in Taman Negara Pahang engage in fishing as a source of family sustenance. Various methods and techniques are employed to catch these wild freshwater fish, depending on the species. Different species require different methods of capture.

Using Nets
Nets are set up in the upper or lower areas of rapids, usually in curved areas. There are two methods: submerged nets or floating nets. Floating nets are popular as they make it easier for village fishermen to see and collect fish using wooden boats. Nets are set up for an extended period, and the collection is done daily, usually in the morning. A popular netting method in Taman Negara villages is the drift netting technique. Using a sampan (small boat), fishermen release the net into the water, with the net floating and secured with plastic bottles. The net is left to drift according to the river’s flow. The length of the net is typically around 20 feet for easy handling by fishermen. The net is allowed to drift for about 100 meters, depending on the area’s conditions, whether there are many logs or rapids. The sampan will slowly pull the end of the net in a circular motion. The catch usually includes red mahseer, catfish, bagrid catfish, lampam, krai, and hampala barb. The size of the fish depends on the size of the mesh used in the net.

Using Fish Traps
There are two methods of using fish traps: setting traps from the land, either from the riverbank or rocky areas in rapids, and using traps from wooden boats. Typically, when using the boat method, two people work together. This is to facilitate one person steering the boat engine while the other person spreads the net. Using a boat is ideal for catching large fish, while setting traps from the riverbank or rocky areas is suitable for catching smaller fish. When setting traps from the land, lampam, tengas, and leaf fish are usually caught. If using rocky areas, wallago attu, hampala barb, and krai are caught, while using a boat can result in catching catfish, red mahseer, wallago attu, and lampam.

Fishing
Fishing is popular, whether among the villagers of Taman Negara or external visitors. Fishing methods are typically used for catching catfish, bagrid catfish, red mahseer, hampala barb (casting), and giant freshwater prawns. Bait used includes palm fruit, small fish, small prawns, worms, and processed fish food. The fishing area and the condition of the river, whether clear or murky, and whether it is low tide or high tide, play a role in determining the catch. As a guide, calm water during low tide and clear water is suitable for catching giant freshwater prawns, leaf fish, and lampam. For hampala barb and red mahseer, areas with rapids are suitable. Meanwhile, deep water areas are suitable for catching larger fish such as giant snakehead, catfish, and wallago attu.

Setting Traps/Crepes
This technique is popularly used by the indigenous people of the Batek tribe in Taman Negara. Traps or crepes are made using bamboo and rattan, readily available in the forest around Taman Negara villages. Traps are set in calm water areas, usually under rapids, creating a passage for fish after rapid water flow. After setting the traps, villagers will check and collect the results after 2 or 3 days. Typically, medium-sized and small fish will enter these traps, such as lampam, small hampala barb, leaf fish, and tengas.

Using Fishing Lines
This method involves tying a large hook and fishing line to a tree branch along the riverbank. The branch used is typically around 3-4 inches in diameter, and the bait used is usually the young fish of lampam or tengas. Villagers in Taman Negara will check their catch every 2-3 days, and usually, large-sized fish will take the bait, such as catfish, red mahseer, giant snakehead, and wallago attu.

There are several other methods used by the people of Taman Negara to obtain food from the Pahang River, such as the technique of drifting plastic bottles suspended by a string and hook, diving, and various other methods.

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✅Surcharge RM200 per room per night during 1 July – 31 August.
✅Canopy walkway is close on Friday. If booking made on Friday, this activity will cancel (no refund) or postpone to the next day due to closure. Surcharge RM200 per boat for maximum 4 pax and RM300 per boat for maximum 12 pax.
✅For order less the 48 hours, the booking is subjected to Tourist guide availability. If the tourist guides not available, we will either refund the booking or discuss to postpone to other day.

We will request by using PayPal to your e-mail after booking has been made

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